Things To Do

 

 

 

 

Things To Do in Waterford

 Waterford by Night

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Places of interest

A view from The Quays: “The Three Sisters” mix near the city before flowing into the harbour.The old city of Waterford consists of various cultural quarters. The oldest is what has been referred to as the Viking triangle. This is the part of the city surrounded by the original 10th century fortifications, which is triangular in shape with its apex at Reginald’s tower.

Though this was once the site of a thriving Viking city, the city centre has shifted to the west over the years, and it is now a quiet and tranquil area, dominated by narrow streets, medieval architecture, and civic spaces. Over the past decade, a number of restaurants have opened in High Street and Henrietta Street, taking advantage of the charming character of the area. Much of Waterford’s impressive architecture is to be found in the Viking triangle.

In the 15th century, the city was enlarged with the building of an outer wall on the west side. Today Waterford retains more of its city walls than any other city in Ireland with the exception of Derry, whose walls were built much later. Tours of Waterford’s city walls are conducted daily.

The Quay, once termed by historian Mark Girouard ‘the noblest quay in Europe’, is a mile long from Grattan Quay to Adelphi Quay, though Adelphi Quay is now a residential area. It is still a major focal point for Waterford, commercially and socially, and the face that Waterford presents to those traveling into the city from the north. Near Reginald’s Tower is the William Vincent Wallace Plaza, a monument and amenity built around the time of the millennium that commemorates the Waterford born composer.

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John Roberts Square is a pedestrianised area that is one of the main focal points of Waterford’s modern day commercial centre.

Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, Barronstrand Street, WaterfordIt was named after the city’s most celebrated architect, John Roberts, and was formed from the junction of Barronstrand Street, Broad Street and George’s Street. It is often referred to locally as Red Square, due to the red paving that was used when the area was first pedestrianised. A short distance to the east of John Roberts Square is Arundel Square, another square with a fine commercial tradition, which the City Square shopping centre opens onto.

Ballybricken, in the west, just outside the city walls, is thought to have been Waterford’s Irishtown, a type of settlement that often formed outside Irish cities to house the Vikings and Irish that had been expelled during the Norman conquest of Ireland. Ballybricken is an inner city neighbourhood with a long tradition, centred around Ballybricken hill, which was a large, open market-square. Today it has been converted into a green, civic space, but the Bull Post, where livestock was once bought and sold, still stands as a remnant of the hill’s past.

The Mall is a fine Georgian thoroughfare, built by the Wide Streets Commission in order to extend the city southwards. It contains some of the city’s finest Georgian architecture. The People’s Park, Waterford’s largest and finest park, is located nearby.

Ferrybank in Co Kilkenny is Waterford city’s only suburb north of the river. It contains a village centre of its own. Kilkenny Co Council have granted permission for a number of major retail developments in Ferrybank. One has been completed and the second is currently under construction and due to be completed in January 2009.

In April 2003 an important site combining a 5th century Iron Age and 9th century Viking settlement was discovered at Woodstown near the city, which appears to have been a Viking town that predates all such settlements in Ireland.

                   Waterford Crystal (10 min drive from Claddagh)

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Good news, a brand new home for Waterford Crystal is scheduled to open on June 1st 2010 on a 1.5 acre site in the heart of Waterford City. This is a fantastic location set back just 100 yards or so from the city’s main quay, and bordering the city’s Viking Triangle area, about which there is more later in this Ezine.

The new manufacturing facility will include highly skilled local craftsmen and will produce 40,000 crystal pieces per year using traditional methods. The House of Waterford range that will be produced will include trophies for prestigious sporting events, bowls and vases from the museum, heritage and designer collections, and also the special order stemware collection.

The Visitor Retail Experience will open on the 1st June 2010 over 7 days. Admission to the Visitor Retail Experience is complimentary and will include the following: the largest display of Waterford Crystal in the world, Retail Store, Exhibition and Crystal Installation areas, coffee shop, worldwide shipping facility, and adjacent car parking.

The factory tour for coach groups and itineraries will commence on the 15th June 2010, these guided tours will operate 7 days and will include the following traditional production areas: Wooden mould making, Crystal Blowing and Furnace, Quality Inspection & Finishing, Crystal Cutting, Crystal Sculpting & Engraving, Chandelier Assembly, and Design Inspiration.

CLICK HERE for the Waterford Crystal website.

                      Waterford Golf Club (2 min drive from Claddagh)

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Founded in 1912, Waterford Golf Club is situated on a hill overlooking the historic city of Waterford in the Sunny South East of Ireland. The front 9 was designed by Willie Park (twice Open Champion), and the back 9 was designed by the great James Braid, five times Open Champion.

With its magnificent views, this parkland course is a gem on the outskirts of Waterford. The irregular city, with its towers and steeples spread before the eye along the valley, and in the west, Slievenamon and the Comeragh Mountains, make a background of enduring splendor.

To book greenfees in advance contact Miriam at Claddagh.